Institute Calls Canadians Back Home

OTTAWA—In 1985 J. Richard Bond, then associate professor of physics at Stanford University, returned to his alma mater, the University of Toronto, to spend a year at its Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics. Last June, despite the attractive climate and an offer of tenure from Stanford, the 36-year-old Canadian decided to stay in Toronto. The choice is unusual for citizens of a country that has traditionally lost its best scientists to its southern neighbor. The deciding factor

David Spurgeon
Apr 19, 1987
OTTAWA—In 1985 J. Richard Bond, then associate professor of physics at Stanford University, returned to his alma mater, the University of Toronto, to spend a year at its Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics. Last June, despite the attractive climate and an offer of tenure from Stanford, the 36-year-old Canadian decided to stay in Toronto.

The choice is unusual for citizens of a country that has traditionally lost its best scientists to its southern neighbor. The deciding factor was the young, non-profit Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIAR).

By making him a Fellow of its cosmology program, the CIAR was able to offer him conditions rarely found in Canada: freedom to pursue his interests without teaching or administrative duties, the opportunity to work with the best people in his field regardless of where they are located, and a salary and benefits competitive with those in leading research centers around the world....

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