Institutions Hustle To Meet NIH Ethics Training Mandate

Universities and other grant recipients seek to comply with requirement that curricula include moral rectitude courses "So what do you do if you see misconduct in scientific research?" asked a student at last month's introductory lecture for a new "Ethics in Research" series, organized jointly by New York's Rockefeller University, Cornell University Medical College, and the Sloan-Kettering Institute. Cornell medical dean, Robert Michels responded to the question by voicing his school's offici

Robin Eisner
Oct 27, 1991
Universities and other grant recipients seek to comply with requirement that curricula include moral rectitude courses
"So what do you do if you see misconduct in scientific research?" asked a student at last month's introductory lecture for a new "Ethics in Research" series, organized jointly by New York's Rockefeller University, Cornell University Medical College, and the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

Cornell medical dean, Robert Michels responded to the question by voicing his school's official policy. But in his talk he also supplied a few addenda: He reminded the student, for instance, that whistle-blowers don't get treated well by our society, and that it's not generally accepted to rat on your friends.

But he also added the overriding message: The greater moral imperative is to tell the truth--even at the risk of personal disadvantage.

These days, such pronouncements on misconduct, whistle-blowing, moral imperatives, and the like are being heard not only in the...

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