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Japanese Deal With U.S. School Promises To Boost Science

Salem-Teikyo University in West Virginia awaits an influx of Asian students as it links up with a Florida biotech institute Wayne England, a fungus physiologist and chairman of natural sciences at Salem-Teikyo University, has had a longtime interest in shiitake mushrooms. But it was only last year that he thought about learning Japanese. That's when Teikyo University bought Salem (W.Va.) College and announced that some 500 Japanese students would be arriving over the next three years beginning

Marcia Clemmitt


Salem-Teikyo University in West Virginia awaits an influx of Asian students as it links up with a Florida biotech institute
Wayne England, a fungus physiologist and chairman of natural sciences at Salem-Teikyo University, has had a longtime interest in shiitake mushrooms. But it was only last year that he thought about learning Japanese. That's when Teikyo University bought Salem (W.Va.) College and announced that some 500 Japanese students would be arriving over the next three years beginning last month. The influx will double the enrollment.

A merger with the 22,000-student Teikyo University last July bailed Salem out of financial difficulties. And though administrators expect most Japanese students to major in business after completing the two-year core curriculum, England says he's "hoping some will trickle into science majors, after they get more English under their belts and begin to see the range of things they can do."

That's not all that...

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