John Maddox Offers Surprising Insights Into His

In 1955, a puckish, 30-year-old Weishman resigned as lecturer in theoretical physics at the University of Manchester to become science correspondent of the Manchester Guardian. Unwittingly, the energetically eclectic John Maddox thus took his first step toward the editorial chair of Nature, which he has occupied with distinction on two occasions—between 1966 and 1973, and from 1980 until the present. A robust defender of what he calls “the scientific enterprise,” Maddox has

Bernard Dixon
Jun 12, 1988
In 1955, a puckish, 30-year-old Weishman resigned as lecturer in theoretical physics at the University of Manchester to become science correspondent of the Manchester Guardian. Unwittingly, the energetically eclectic John Maddox thus took his first step toward the editorial chair of Nature, which he has occupied with distinction on two occasions—between 1966 and 1973, and from 1980 until the present.

A robust defender of what he calls “the scientific enterprise,” Maddox has played many other roles in science and public affairs He was an affiliate of New York’s Rockefeller Institute in 1962-63, director of London’s Nuffield Found ation from 1975 to 1980, and a public interest representative on the UK Genetic Manipulation Advisory Group from 1976 to 1980. Maddox was also managing director of Macmillan Journal’s Ltd., a publishing house from 1970 to 1972 and chairman of Maddox Editorial Ltd. (whose publications included the European Gazette) from 1972 to 1974....

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