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Lasker Laureates Make Up Impressive Biomedical Roster

The Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards officially turn 50 this year and, by almost any measure, have a luster unsurpassed among American awards for biomedical research and second internationally only to the near-twice-as-old Nobel Prizes. The reason is obvious to many members of the jury and previous award winners. NEW ROLE: Lasker laureate Joseph L. Goldstein takes over as jury chair. "No award is better than its recipients," says Joseph L. Goldstein, winner of a Lasker in 1985 and a Nobe

Billy Goodman
The Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards officially turn 50 this year and, by almost any measure, have a luster unsurpassed among American awards for biomedical research and second internationally only to the near-twice-as-old Nobel Prizes. The reason is obvious to many members of the jury and previous award winners.

Joseph Goldstein NEW ROLE: Lasker laureate Joseph L. Goldstein takes over as jury chair.


"No award is better than its recipients," says Joseph L. Goldstein, winner of a Lasker in 1985 and a Nobel Prize the same year for discovering the basic mechanisms controlling cholesterol metabolism. Goldstein this year assumes the chairmanship of the Lasker awards jury.

The roster of Lasker laureates reads like a Who's Who of modern biomedical science: Oswald Avery, Edwin Krebs, Peyton Rous, Barbara McClintock, Rosalyn Yalow, Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin, James Watson and Francis Crick, J. Michael Bishop and Harold Varmus, among many illustrious others. Goldstein,...

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