Marijuana Ruling Exempts Federally Funded Research

"In the case of the Controlled Substances Act, the statute reflects a determination that marijuana has no medical benefits worthy of an exception (outside the confines of a government-approved research project)." -Justice Clarence Thomas1 The Supreme Court's recent ruling against manufacturing and distributing medicinal cannabis does not appear to have had any immediate impact on either basic or clinical research studies under way. Some investigators, however, remain leery about the potential f

A. J. S. Rayl
Jun 24, 2001
"In the case of the Controlled Substances Act, the statute reflects a determination that marijuana has no medical benefits worthy of an exception (outside the confines of a government-approved research project)." -Justice Clarence Thomas1


The Supreme Court's recent ruling against manufacturing and distributing medicinal cannabis does not appear to have had any immediate impact on either basic or clinical research studies under way. Some investigators, however, remain leery about the potential for research being compromised in the future.

The ruling comes at a time when research into cannabis, and its active ingredient delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is booming. Just last year, the nation's first Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) opened at the University of California, San Diego, and more projects involving the infamous weed have been approved in the last couple of years than ever before. But it's been a long time coming, and "it hasn't been easy," says University...

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