More Biotech Ph.D.'s Opting To Take Postdocs In Industry

Better pay and richer research environments in the business sector lure young science grads away from academic labs Two years ago, when Thomas Malvar was finishing his doctorate in molecular immunology, he came to a major career crossroads. Should he go the traditional route and do his postdoctoral training in a university? Or should he follow a more adventurous path and do his postdoc in industry--a road that some of his professors warned was a professional dead end? Like a small but growin

Jean Wallace
Oct 11, 1992
Better pay and richer research environments in the business sector lure young science grads away from academic labs
Two years ago, when Thomas Malvar was finishing his doctorate in molecular immunology, he came to a major career crossroads. Should he go the traditional route and do his postdoctoral training in a university? Or should he follow a more adventurous path and do his postdoc in industry--a road that some of his professors warned was a professional dead end?

Like a small but growing number of other life scientists with newly acquired Ph.D.'s, Malvar chose industry. He's doing his postdoc at Ecogen Inc., an agricultural biotech firm in Langhorne, Pa. There, he's using recombinant DNA technology to study the lethal effects of microbial toxins on beetles and caterpillars. And he says he made the right decision.

"Coming out of academia, you're kind of biased against industry," he says. "But I no...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?