New AAU Head Sees Stormy Future For University Science Departments

Academic science in the United States is in for some rough times from the government, according to the newly appointed president of the Association of American Universities (AAU). "This is a time of challenge, perhaps more than we've seen in several decades--when major research universities are acting under some duress and, perhaps, when some science in the U.S. has come somewhat into question," says Cornelius J. Pings, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the University o

Ron Kaufman
Nov 8, 1992
Academic science in the United States is in for some rough times from the government, according to the newly appointed president of the Association of American Universities (AAU).

"This is a time of challenge, perhaps more than we've seen in several decades--when major research universities are acting under some duress and, perhaps, when some science in the U.S. has come somewhat into question," says Cornelius J. Pings, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. He will assume the AAU presidency on February 15.

Pings will succeed Robert M. Rosenzweig, who has served a decade in the post. Rosenzweig, the vice president for public affairs at Stanford University before joining AAU, will now do university consulting and writing from his home in California.

Pings, who has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, identifies some members of the U.S. legislative and executive branches...

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