New Animal Care Guide Leaves Details To Scientists' Discretion

Sidebars How to Get the Guide Committee to Revise the ILAR Guide REVISIONIST: Retired teacher Jo Ann Steggerda's presence on the panel was criticized. Most laboratory scientists, and even some animal-welfare advocates, are applauding the newly published seventh edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. The new edition, the first update since 1985, was published by the National Research Council's Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR). It places far greater rel

Robert Finn
Jul 21, 1996

Sidebars
How to Get the Guide
Committee to Revise the ILAR Guide

REVISIONIST: Retired teacher Jo Ann Steggerda's presence on the panel was criticized.
Most laboratory scientists, and even some animal-welfare advocates, are applauding the newly published seventh edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. The new edition, the first update since 1985, was published by the National Research Council's Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR). It places far greater reliance on scientific judgment in the housing and care of research animals, and moves away from mandating specific solutions. However, some animal-care experts remain uncertain about how to interpret a few of its provisions and are worried that compliance may increase their costs.

The ILAR guide's requirements are binding on all research supported by Public Health Service agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health. Many other...

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