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New NAS Members Reflect Scope of Science Today

The newly elected members and foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) represent 64 scientific fields manifesting the ever-shifting boundaries of science. Stephen Berry, home secretary of the NAS, says the new class reflects the expansion of science into several new directions; computer and information sciences, biophysics, and human environmental sciences were added a year ago. "All the new and expanded areas correspond to new areas or lie within the bounds of traditional fi

Hal Cohen
The newly elected members and foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) represent 64 scientific fields manifesting the ever-shifting boundaries of science. Stephen Berry, home secretary of the NAS, says the new class reflects the expansion of science into several new directions; computer and information sciences, biophysics, and human environmental sciences were added a year ago. "All the new and expanded areas correspond to new areas or lie within the bounds of traditional fields. So there's always some kind of balance," says Berry.

Formed in 1863, the NAS is dedicated to advising the US government on any matter of science and technology. The organization elected 72 new members and 15 foreign associates April 30, bringing the total active membership to 2,237. The newly elected members, though unsure of their new responsibilities, are eager to begin lending their services to the academy.

Donna Coveney/MIT

Vernon Martin Ingram

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