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Analytical chemists are often faced with the task of separating complex chemical mixtures into pure chemical species that can then be precisely identified. To accomplish this task, scientists often use liquid chromatography (LC) or gas chromatography (GC) techniques followed by use of a variety of sophisticated spectroscopic detectors to analyze the purified compounds. At next month's Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, more than 800 companies will unveil a v

Richard Sheridan
Analytical chemists are often faced with the task of separating complex chemical mixtures into pure chemical species that can then be precisely identified. To accomplish this task, scientists often use liquid chromatography (LC) or gas chromatography (GC) techniques followed by use of a variety of sophisticated spectroscopic detectors to analyze the purified compounds. At next month's Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, more than 800 companies will unveil a variety of recent innovations in chromatographic equipment (including spectroscopic detectors) as well as products used for processing samples prior to analysis.

In addition to browsing through exhibits of the latest tools of the trade, the 30,000 scientists expected to attend will have the option of sitting in on their choice of nearly 1,600 technical papers pertaining to analytical chemistry and spectroscopy. The Atlanta meeting is sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference, a volunteer-run nonprofit organization that is cosponsored by the...

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