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The National Institutes of Health is now accepting applications for grants in embryonic stem cell research after unveiling its Web-based Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry (http://escr.nih.gov/). About a handful of applications have been received so far; the first awards should be announced in early 2002. This registry lists names and contact information for 11 worldwide organizations offering 72 cell lines that meet the federal funding requirements outlined by President George W. Bush in August

Ted Agres
The National Institutes of Health is now accepting applications for grants in embryonic stem cell research after unveiling its Web-based Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry (http://escr.nih.gov/). About a handful of applications have been received so far; the first awards should be announced in early 2002. This registry lists names and contact information for 11 worldwide organizations offering 72 cell lines that meet the federal funding requirements outlined by President George W. Bush in August. The listed cell lines, however, are in varying developmental stages and not all are available. For instance, only one of five cell lines offered by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), licensing arm of the University of Wisconsin, is listed as ready for distribution. Meanwhile, US senators agreed to postpone debate on two contentious life science issues: expanding stem cell funding to include research on embryo creation; and banning certain cloning technologies. Senators Arlen...

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