News Notes

Biomedical scientists from 16 countries who are supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) International Research Scholars program will meet as a group for the first time this month in Maryland. The meeting provides a forum for both technical presentations and discussions about how researchers in different parts of the world might work together more effectively. Since 1991 HHMI has awarded more than $53 million in five-year grants to 177 research scientists working at their home i

Nadia Halim
Jun 11, 2000

Biomedical scientists from 16 countries who are supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) International Research Scholars program will meet as a group for the first time this month in Maryland. The meeting provides a forum for both technical presentations and discussions about how researchers in different parts of the world might work together more effectively. Since 1991 HHMI has awarded more than $53 million in five-year grants to 177 research scientists working at their home institutions. "Science is moving so fast, especially in biology, that no part of the world should be left behind in this era of genomics and postgenomics. We [the United States] should ensure the research is being forwarded collaboratively, internationally," explains Joseph Perpich, vice president of grants and special programs. The program has primarily funded junior faculty, who are often the first to lose funding in countries that traditionally concentrate their limited resources on senior faculty in state-run universities. Researchers, particularly from the Baltics, the former Soviet Union, central Europe, and Latin America, have indicated that HHMI support has helped them remain in their home countries or return there. "It is exciting for us to see the results stable funding has on the quality and progress of research in these countries," adds Perpich.