News Notes

Women in Cancer Research Women in Cancer Research (WICR) will dissolve as an independent organization and become a council in the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). In essence WICR is going back to its roots. According to Mary Jean Sawey, immediate past president of WICR and research associate professor of radiation oncology at Temple University Medical School, several years ago many female scientists felt they needed a vehicle to promote advancement of women in cancer-related bio

Nadia Halim
May 1, 2000

Women in Cancer Research

Women in Cancer Research (WICR) will dissolve as an independent organization and become a council in the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). In essence WICR is going back to its roots. According to Mary Jean Sawey, immediate past president of WICR and research associate professor of radiation oncology at Temple University Medical School, several years ago many female scientists felt they needed a vehicle to promote advancement of women in cancer-related biomedical research. They didn't want to be just another committee in the AACR, so they formed an independent, incorporated organization in 1988, though they also retained AACR membership. Since then WICR has provided mentors and role models for younger scientists. It has also helped women gain more power in the AACR by holding leadership positions, giving talks, and chairing meetings. "We have formed quite a power base and have had an impact in...

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