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A Declaration Supporting Ag Biotech With the recent announcement that major grain companies in the United States will indeed purchase genetically modified (GM) crops despite the proliferation of silly humans dressed as Monarch butterflies in the United Kingdom and here, it seems as if the public debate over GM foods may finally consider scientific reasoning. To bolster consumer confidence that GM tomatoes are not likely to make them grow second heads, 1,800-plus scientists, including many noted

Ricki Lewis

A Declaration Supporting Ag Biotech

With the recent announcement that major grain companies in the United States will indeed purchase genetically modified (GM) crops despite the proliferation of silly humans dressed as Monarch butterflies in the United Kingdom and here, it seems as if the public debate over GM foods may finally consider scientific reasoning. To bolster consumer confidence that GM tomatoes are not likely to make them grow second heads, 1,800-plus scientists, including many noted notables, have signed a document entitled "Scientists in support of agricultural biotechnology." The brainchild of Tuskegee University professor of plant molecular biology C.S. Prakash, the statement will be presented to world leaders, the media, and international organizations. "This declaration was drafted with the hope that as scientists we could collectively and coherently say to society that food derived from biotechnology is safe and tested, and there is solid science behind its development, testing,...

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