NIH Ethics Guidelines Draw Hostile Response

WASHINGTON—In a document that is being roundly condemned by science administrators, lobbyists, and other observers, the National Institutes of Health has proposed vol- untary guidelines on financial conflicts of interest by university researchers. The criticism from experts in the field is expected to sharpen the explosive debate on how to preserve the integrity of federally funded research while at the same time translating that research into products that are designed to improve publi

Jeffrey Mervis
Oct 15, 1989

WASHINGTON—In a document that is being roundly condemned by science administrators, lobbyists, and other observers, the National Institutes of Health has proposed vol- untary guidelines on financial conflicts of interest by university researchers.

The criticism from experts in the field is expected to sharpen the explosive debate on how to preserve the integrity of federally funded research while at the same time translating that research into products that are designed to improve public health.

The guidelines appear in the September 15 issue of the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts (vol 18, no. 32). They apply to any research funded by NIH or the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA). Under the proposal, universities and other recipients of federal funds are advised to draw up policies to monitor potential conflicts of interest by faculty and other employees that could distort the conduct or results of such research.

The...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?