No Action Seen After Hearing On Policy Office

WASHINGTON-Congress has several options to strengthen the effectiveness of the White House science adviser and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). But a hearing last month, more tame than some had expected, made clear that no changes are contemplated before the next president takes office. Part of the perception of weakness was attributed to the relatively low profile of the current adviser, William R. Graham; OSTP's modest budget of less than $2 million, and its small staff o

Ted Agres
Mar 6, 1988
WASHINGTON-Congress has several options to strengthen the effectiveness of the White House science adviser and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). But a hearing last month, more tame than some had expected, made clear that no changes are contemplated before the next president takes office.

Part of the perception of weakness was attributed to the relatively low profile of the current adviser, William R. Graham; OSTP's modest budget of less than $2 million, and its small staff of 15 permanent and 20 temporary full-time employees. "All of us can agree that this activity is vastly under-manned," testified Edward David Jr., science adviser to President Nixon. "In fact, I would call the level of manning and budget ludicrously small."

But Graham, as the lead witness, stated that OSTP's staffing and operations were adequate. He said he would recommend a similar arrangement for the new administration. Although subcommittee members clearly...

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