Nobel Peace Prize Signals New Beginning For Pugwash

Sidebar: Plugging into Pugwash It would be reasonable to assume that last month's awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs and Pugwash president and cofounder Joseph Rotblat represents something of a glorious swan song. The conferences and Polish-born physicist Rotblat, 87, were honored by the Nobel Committee last month in Oslo, Norway, for their nearly 40-year effort "to diminish the part played by nuclear arms in international politics" (K.Y. K

Karen Young Kreeger
Jan 7, 1996
Sidebar: Plugging into Pugwash

It would be reasonable to assume that last month's awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs and Pugwash president and cofounder Joseph Rotblat represents something of a glorious swan song. The conferences and Polish-born physicist Rotblat, 87, were honored by the Nobel Committee last month in Oslo, Norway, for their nearly 40-year effort "to diminish the part played by nuclear arms in international politics" (K.Y. Kreeger, The Scientist, Nov. 13, 1995, page 1).

But as Rotblat and the group's many thousands of members and admirers point out emphatically, their work is hardly over. The challenges to peace and disarmament in the post-Cold War world are different-and in many ways more difficult-they maintain.

Although nuclear disarmament remains Pugwash's main concern, the subjects tackled at annual conferences and workshops have branched out in a number of...