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NSF Asks For More Of What Congress Already Likes

14% increase features more for education, academic facilities, and some new projects that look into space. WASHINGTON--This year NSF decided to go with the flow. The 14% increase requested in President Bush's 1991 proposed budget, which continues the pledge first made by President Reagan in 1987 to double the agency's budget in five years, would give more money to several programs that Congress already supports. As a result, foundation officials think their $2.38 billion budget has a better ch

Jeffrey Mervis


14% increase features more for education, academic facilities, and some new projects that look into space.
WASHINGTON--This year NSF decided to go with the flow. The 14% increase requested in President Bush's 1991 proposed budget, which continues the pledge first made by President Reagan in 1987 to double the agency's budget in five years, would give more money to several programs that Congress already supports. As a result, foundation officials think their $2.38 billion budget has a better chance of surviving intact than has been the case in recent years, when similar large requests were trimmed sharply.

"We have a lot going for us," NSF Director Erich Bloch told members of the National Science Board at its February 9 meeting. "Many of the things that we're asking for are also important themes in the overall budget." He ticked off education, academic facilities, global climate change and the environment, and a...

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