Of Super Tuesday and Superconductivity

Campaign ‘88 has now passed through the Straits of Super Tuesday. Not all candidates passed in safety. Republican George Bush swamped his opponents, while among the Democrats the field was narrowed considerably, with Michael Dukakis, Albert Gore and Jesse Jackson the apparent survivors. Whoever the eventual nominees for the two parties, the pair should focus their debates, at least in some part, on ways to ensure the effective use of our scientific assets. In our last issue we ran a p

Eugene Garfield
Mar 20, 1988

Campaign ‘88 has now passed through the Straits of Super Tuesday. Not all candidates passed in safety.

Republican George Bush swamped his opponents, while among the Democrats the field was narrowed considerably, with Michael Dukakis, Albert Gore and Jesse Jackson the apparent survivors. Whoever the eventual nominees for the two parties, the pair should focus their debates, at least in some part, on ways to ensure the effective use of our scientific assets. In our last issue we ran a profile of the candidates’ positions on science issues (THE SCIENTIST, March 7, 1988, p. 8-9). Edwin Diamond and Norman Sandler conducted a similar survey recently in Issues in Science and Technology (“Panning for Issues in Campaign ‘88,” volume IV, no. 2, Winter 1988, p. 60-69).

Reading the statements of the candidates and listening to their speeches makes one hunger for more substance, more precision. For example, how do they propose...

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