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On the Fast Track in Functional Proteomics

Graphic: Leza Berardone Researchers in Canada and Denmark are employing mass spectrometry, three-dimensional tissue biology, and supercomputing to blaze a trail in functional proteomics research. In the process, they're putting their company, MDS Proteomics Inc., on the fast track in the latest race to develop new drug targets and eventually better treatments for all kinds of diseases. By using this combination of technologies, MDS Proteomics is accelerating the process of identifying, analyzin

A. J. S. Rayl
Graphic: Leza Berardone
Researchers in Canada and Denmark are employing mass spectrometry, three-dimensional tissue biology, and supercomputing to blaze a trail in functional proteomics research. In the process, they're putting their company, MDS Proteomics Inc., on the fast track in the latest race to develop new drug targets and eventually better treatments for all kinds of diseases. By using this combination of technologies, MDS Proteomics is accelerating the process of identifying, analyzing, and understanding the myriad structures, interactions, and pathways of proteins.

"This integrated approach is critical to developing a new generation of drugs to treat disease," says Matthias Mann, scientific founder of MDS Proteomics and chief proteomics officer. Medical Data Services (MDS) Inc., an international health and life sciences company based in Toronto, launched MDS Proteomics in 2000 following the purchase of Protana, a Danish proteomics company. It is currently expanding its headquarters, and research facilities are under...

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