Opinions Vary On Whether Unabomb Suspect Will Damage Science's Image

Damage Science's Image MAD SCIENTIST? Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaozynski was turned in by his brother As the Federal Bureau of Investigation quietly builds its case against Unabomber suspect Theodore J. Kaczynski, observers ponder how the popular media's depiction of the Montana loner and former mathematician will affect the public's perception of science. Opinions range from beliefs that people will easily separate Kaczynski's credentials from his alleged crimes to fears that the case-play

Thomas Durso
Jun 9, 1996

Damage Science's Image


MAD SCIENTIST? Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaozynski was turned in by his brother
As the Federal Bureau of Investigation quietly builds its case against Unabomber suspect Theodore J. Kaczynski, observers ponder how the popular media's depiction of the Montana loner and former mathematician will affect the public's perception of science. Opinions range from beliefs that people will easily separate Kaczynski's credentials from his alleged crimes to fears that the case-played out in front-page headlines and sound bites-will reinforce stereotypes of "mad scientists."


'ANOTHER EXAMPLE': The case could prove "very troublesome for science," worries Paul Gross.
"No sensible person is going to identify Mr. Kaczynski or the Unabomber with science or as a representative thereof," declares Paul R. Gross, the University Professor of Life Sciences and director of the Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Virginia. "On the other hand, the overwhelming majority of the public, I...

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