ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

OTA, Fighting For Its Life In Congress, Draws From Both Sides Of The Aisle

vote with bipartisan backing, but the true test is yet to come. ON SHAKY GROUND: Director Rodger Herman notes that the House plan to save OTA can still be undone in the Senate. Even as the United States House of Representatives moved toward what many viewed as inevitable - a vote to abolish the 23-year-old Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) - the agency's director, Roger Herdman, headed for the office of Sen. Arlen Specter (R- Pa.). Herdman hoped the presidential aspirant would help halt th

Steve Sternberg
vote with bipartisan backing, but the true test is yet to come. Herdman ON SHAKY GROUND: Director Rodger Herman notes that the House plan to save OTA can still be undone in the Senate.

Even as the United States House of Representatives moved toward what many viewed as inevitable - a vote to abolish the 23-year-old Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) - the agency's director, Roger Herdman, headed for the office of Sen. Arlen Specter (R- Pa.). Herdman hoped the presidential aspirant would help halt the anti-OTA juggernaut in the Senate.

To Herdman's surprise, late last month the House narrowly approved a compromise - contained in an amendment to the House's $1.7 billion Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill - that would spare the embattled agency, trim its $22 million budget by about one-third, and move OTA into the Library of Congress.

Nevertheless, Herdman points out, that compromise still can be undone in...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT