Persistence Prevails for John Scott Recipients

PHOTO CREDIT: Lori Desantis, Children's Hospital of Boston ANGIOGENESIS HONORS: Children's Hospital of Boston researcher Judah Folkman (far right) received the 1998 John Scott Award from the Philadelphia Board of Directors of City Trusts for his work in studying angiogenesis and angiogenesis inhibitors. Folkman, who refuses to be photographed alone, is joined by Harvard Medical School colleagues (from right) Donald Ingber, Michael O'Reilly, and Robert D'Amato. After being built up by a New York

Paul Smaglik
Dec 6, 1998

PHOTO CREDIT: Lori Desantis, Children's Hospital of Boston

ANGIOGENESIS HONORS: Children's Hospital of Boston researcher Judah Folkman (far right) received the 1998 John Scott Award from the Philadelphia Board of Directors of City Trusts for his work in studying angiogenesis and angiogenesis inhibitors. Folkman, who refuses to be photographed alone, is joined by Harvard Medical School colleagues (from right) Donald Ingber, Michael O'Reilly, and Robert D'Amato.
After being built up by a New York Times article1 in May and torn down by a Wall Street Journal story2 in November, M. Judah Folkman spoke of the thin line between persistence and obstinance as he accepted on Nov. 20 the 1998 John Scott Award for his work in angiogenesis. Baruch S. Blumberg, who also received the $10,000 award from the Philadelphia Board of Directors of City Trusts, also mentioned persistence, as well as the importance of collaboration, when he...

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