Prominent Scientist Switches Labs, Sparking Administrative Fireworks

Philadelphia's reputation for brotherly love suffers after Carlo Croce decides to remove himself and his staff from Fels Institute Cell lines have died. At least one grant deadline will be missed. Scientists speak with bitterness and resentment about their colleagues, and an entire university's commitment to science is being called into question. Things are far from business as usual at Temple University's Fels Institute in Philadelphia, where earlier this year institute director Carlo Croce an

Susan L-J Dickinson
Jun 23, 1991
Philadelphia's reputation for brotherly love suffers after Carlo Croce decides to remove himself and his staff from Fels Institute
Cell lines have died. At least one grant deadline will be missed. Scientists speak with bitterness and resentment about their colleagues, and an entire university's commitment to science is being called into question. Things are far from business as usual at Temple University's Fels Institute in Philadelphia, where earlier this year institute director Carlo Croce announced a plan to move his lab across town to Jefferson Medical College. Twenty-five of the other 31 principal investigators at Fels and their research teams--a total of more than 200 people, including postdocs, graduate students, technicians, and administrators--are moving with him.

It is not unusual for a scientist to change institutions. Many do so several times in a career, as opportunities for expanded research, career advancement, and collaboration with prestigious colleagues present themselves. But a...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?