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Public, Private Health Concerns Spur Rapid Progress In Toxicology

Increasing fears about carcinogens and other poisons will fuel further growth in the already booming field, experts say The science of toxicology has come a long way in a relatively short time. Back in 1961, when a fledgling society of researchers devoted to the study of poisons and their effect on the human body was well-formed enough to merit holding an annual meeting, the group had 161 members. Next week, as the Society of Toxicology (SOT) convenes its 31st annual meeting, its membership

Marcia Clemmitt
Increasing fears about carcinogens and other poisons will fuel further growth in the already booming field, experts say
The science of toxicology has come a long way in a relatively short time. Back in 1961, when a fledgling society of researchers devoted to the study of poisons and their effect on the human body was well-formed enough to merit holding an annual meeting, the group had 161 members.

Next week, as the Society of Toxicology (SOT) convenes its 31st annual meeting, its membership totals more than 3,100, double what it was just seven years ago. And for the first time in its history, with attendance expected to top 4,000, the event will be held in a convention center--in this case the huge Seattle Convention Center.

Another sign of the discipline's growth: At this year's meeting--which runs February 23-27--some 1,600 research advances are to be presented in platform discussions and poster...

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