Report Validating DNA Fingerprint Method Could Hasten Growth In Forensic Biotech

A recent document from the NRC is seen as a boost for entrepreneurs whose ventures center on the controversial technique A recently released National Research Council report on DNA fingerprinting not only puts the stamp of approval on the widely used technique, but also, according to one forensic scientist, should effectively mandate accreditation for labs preforming the test. And in the private sector, many in the business of providing DNA fingerprinting services and supplying reagents for D

Scott Veggeberg
Jun 7, 1992
A recent document from the NRC is seen as a boost for entrepreneurs whose ventures center on the controversial technique
A recently released National Research Council report on DNA fingerprinting not only puts the stamp of approval on the widely used technique, but also, according to one forensic scientist, should effectively mandate accreditation for labs preforming the test.

And in the private sector, many in the business of providing DNA fingerprinting services and supplying reagents for DNA testing see the NRC imprimatur as an economic boon to an already growing industry.

While most criminal courts have ruled that DNA fingerprinting is valid and have allowed it into evidence, some courts have barred this relatively new test on the grounds that prosecutors have not yet proved it is widely accepted in the scientific community. To that end, the FBI, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and other groups commissioned NRC...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?