Reporter's Notebook: AAAS Meeting In San Francisco Offered Mix Of Hard Science, Social Ramifications

As is customary at the annual AAAS meeting, a wide variety of current science-and-society topics were addressed in the sessions. Among these were: the dangers posed by the rapid spread of drug resistance in disease-causing bacteria, the role of science fiction in presenting science to the public, and the ethical questions raised by recent research showing that some men may be genetically predisposed to homosexuality. Following is a

Franklin Hoke
Apr 3, 1994
According to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), precisely 4,148 scientists, students, and others concerned about "Science and a Changing World"--this year's theme--attended the group's 1994 meeting, held Friday, February 18 through Wednesday, February 23, in San Francisco. The meeting also drew well from Washington, D.C., science-policy circles, with Harold Varmus, head of the National Institutes of Health; Neal Lane, director of the National Science Foundation; and Rep. George Brown, Jr. (D- Calif.), chairman of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, among those participating. John H. Gibbons, chief of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, gave the keynote address.

As is customary at the annual AAAS meeting, a wide variety of current science-and-society topics were addressed in the sessions. Among these were: the dangers posed by the rapid spread of drug resistance in disease-causing bacteria, the role of science fiction in presenting science to the...

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