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Research Funds Go Begging, As NIH Minority Plan Gets Feeble Response

While the agency's program to encourage recruitment of minority investigators is said to be `marvelous,' few grantees apply for it WASHINGTON--Nursing professors Irene Lewis and Faye Whitney think they can spot a good thing. And a program that gives scientists as much as $50,000 a year to add a minority investigator onto National Institutes of Health grants is, as far as they are concerned, one of the best deals around. NIH grantee Whitney, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylv

Jeffrey Mervis
While the agency's program to encourage recruitment of minority investigators is said to be `marvelous,' few grantees apply for it
WASHINGTON--Nursing professors Irene Lewis and Faye Whitney think they can spot a good thing. And a program that gives scientists as much as $50,000 a year to add a minority investigator onto National Institutes of Health grants is, as far as they are concerned, one of the best deals around.

NIH grantee Whitney, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, has recruited investigator Lewis, an associate professor at San Jose State University, to Whitney's study of the effects of depression on stroke patients. The collaboration offers Lewis, an African American, a chance to do research at San Jose State, where "teaching, not research, is the priority." For Whitney, Lewis offers experience that will be invaluable in a study with a large number of inner-city minority subjects.

The minority supplements...

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