Science Job Market Is Cool As Summer Heat Sets In

The recessionary economy makes finding work tough for both new graduates and experienced researchers Summertime, and the sidewalks are steaming--tempers short, and the work day long. It's the time of year when people are considering whether they should start looking for a new job. If they begin the search now, they can at least look forward to a new place to work when the cool weather comes. Summer is also the season for new science graduates to make a decision as to whether they should continu

Robin Eisner
Jun 23, 1991
The recessionary economy makes finding work tough for both new graduates and experienced researchers
Summertime, and the sidewalks are steaming--tempers short, and the work day long. It's the time of year when people are considering whether they should start looking for a new job. If they begin the search now, they can at least look forward to a new place to work when the cool weather comes. Summer is also the season for new science graduates to make a decision as to whether they should continue in academia or break away from the campus and seek out a job in industry.

For the summer of 1991, the outlook is on the hazy side for young scientists pounding the hot pavement, curriculum vitae in hand, looking for a new--or a first--professional position. While there are some indications of an upturn in the economy, recessionary strategizing is causing companies and universities to...

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