Scientific Community Recognizing Link Between Ecology And Health

SENSE OF PROPORTION: "more needs to be done relative to the scale of the problem," remarks Stanford ecologist Gretchen Daily. The worldwide spate of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases in the first half of this decade has prompted a growing recognition of the connection between global climate change and human health. Individual researchers from such disparate disciplines as epidemiology and public health, ecology, virology, climatology, nutrition, and biomedicine have directly addresse

Karen Young Kreeger
Mar 3, 1996
Gretchen Daily SENSE OF PROPORTION: "more needs to be done relative to the scale of the problem," remarks Stanford ecologist Gretchen Daily.
The worldwide spate of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases in the first half of this decade has prompted a growing recognition of the connection between global climate change and human health. Individual researchers from such disparate disciplines as epidemiology and public health, ecology, virology, climatology, nutrition, and biomedicine have directly addressed the link. They have been joined by such esteemed groups as the World Health Organization and the United States' National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

The topic has been brought up at international conferences and has been featured in reports and special journal issues. New professional societies and publications have been introduced to explore the subject.

But despite the heightened interest in exploring the environment-human health connection, funding for these efforts is difficult to come by. In an era...

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