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Scientists Roam The Habitat As Zoos Alter Their Mission

With species preservation now becoming at least as important as entertainment, researchers in many fields take up zoo residence "And on your right, enveloped by a cloud of vapor billowing from a just-opened tank that stores eggs, sperm, and embryos at sub-zero temperatures, the scientists in their white lab coats seem to blend into their habitat." This may be what a Cincinnati Zoo tour guide will say this fall as she takes a group of visitors through a unique feature at the zoo--an in vitro f

Robin Eisner
With species preservation now becoming at least as important as entertainment, researchers in many fields take up zoo residence

"And on your right, enveloped by a cloud of vapor billowing from a just-opened tank that stores eggs, sperm, and embryos at sub-zero temperatures, the scientists in their white lab coats seem to blend into their habitat."

This may be what a Cincinnati Zoo tour guide will say this fall as she takes a group of visitors through a unique feature at the zoo--an in vitro fertilization laboratory for exotic animals in the zoo's new, two-floor, $3.5 million research facility.

When this lab exhibit opens, visitors, separated from the scientists by a glass wall, will be able to observe researchers who may actually be creating zoo animal zygotes in petri dishes. The microscopes used by the scientists will be hooked up to video monitors, and guests will be able to see...

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