Smaller Biotechs Capturing Top Talent From Large Pharmaceutical Competitors

Stock options and an openness to independent personalities are increasing the appeal of small firms for creative, ambitious scientists. The ability of small science-based companies to go head-to- head with much larger firms in attracting top scientific talent is growing, according to researchers and human resources analysts. The traditional recruiting advantages of big companies higher salaries and a greater degree of job security have been effectively offset in recent years by major shifts in

Franklin Hoke
Mar 19, 1995


Stock options and an openness to independent personalities are increasing the appeal of small firms for creative, ambitious scientists.
The ability of small science-based companies to go head-to- head with much larger firms in attracting top scientific talent is growing, according to researchers and human resources analysts.

The traditional recruiting advantages of big companies higher salaries and a greater degree of job security have been effectively offset in recent years by major shifts in the commercial research environment, they say. Firms of a few dozen to a few hundred people, such as biotechnology start-ups, can offer more lucrative stock options than those generally available at large drug companies with thousands of employees. Also, widespread layoffs among the pharmaceutical giants have all but destroyed the notion of protected employment. Perhaps equally as important, however, are the creative opportunities small companies can provide and the chance they offer researchers to have a...

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