States Luring Scientists With Salaries, Facilities

Although such appropriations and bond issues promise to foster excellence throughout the state, the primary beneficiaries of much pump priming are usually state colleges and universities. These efforts, in turn, have triggered recruitment wars between established research institutions and newer programs trying to join the top echelon. The bidding is particularly fierce in such fields as ceramics, computers, chemical engineering and all aspects of biotechnology. And although higher salaries alo

Anne Moffat
Jan 10, 1988
Although such appropriations and bond issues promise to foster excellence throughout the state, the primary beneficiaries of much pump priming are usually state colleges and universities. These efforts, in turn, have triggered recruitment wars between established research institutions and newer programs trying to join the top echelon.

The bidding is particularly fierce in such fields as ceramics, computers, chemical engineering and all aspects of biotechnology. And although higher salaries alone are rarely sufficient to trigger such a move, the new buildings and equipment that are made possible with such special appropriations offer a powerful lure to some faculty.

Edward Arnold rejected offers from Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania to accept a position of assistant professor at the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine (CABM), a unit ofRutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. "It's exciting to be part of a nucleus of a new...

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