Studies Call Attention To Ethics Of Industry Support

Sidebar: Fourteen Journals Surveyed on Financial Interest of Authors For More Information On Academic-Industrial Collaborations Two recent studies have renewed attention on the perennial controversy over industry support of academic research. Some observers maintain that conflict-of-interest issues inherent in academic-industrial collaborations compromise scientific integrity and contribute to the public's mistrust of science, while others argue that such relationships benefit society and are a

Karen Young Kreeger
Mar 30, 1997

Sidebar: Fourteen Journals Surveyed on Financial Interest of Authors
For More Information On Academic-Industrial Collaborations

Two recent studies have renewed attention on the perennial controversy over industry support of academic research. Some observers maintain that conflict-of-interest issues inherent in academic-industrial collaborations compromise scientific integrity and contribute to the public's mistrust of science, while others argue that such relationships benefit society and are an integral part of research.


ENSURING HONOR:Lenoard Minsky contends that only compulsory disclosure of financial interests on research papers guarantees integrity.
One analysis, led by Sheldon Krimsky, a professor of urban and environmental policy at Tufts University, found that 34 percent of the articles examined had a first or last author from academia with a financial interest in the described research (S. Krimsky et al., Science and Engineering Ethics, 2:396-410, 1996). Virtually none of these papers made note of that relationship.

The other study, led by...

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