Study Finds Gender Disparity Even Among High Achievers In Science

In Science Author: Robert Finn Sidebar: PROPORTION OF FULL PROFESSORS AMONG FORMER POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS IN ACADEMIC SCIENCE A recently released study from Harvard University examining the careers of scientists who showed high promise as postdocs has found persistent gender differences in career outcomes. The study, called Project Access, reveals clear evidence of a glass ceiling for women in certain fields, notes differences in publication patterns, and elucidates the way that family-related

Robert Finn
Nov 12, 1995

In Science Author: Robert Finn

Sidebar: PROPORTION OF FULL PROFESSORS AMONG FORMER POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS IN ACADEMIC SCIENCE

A recently released study from Harvard University examining the careers of scientists who showed high promise as postdocs has found persistent gender differences in career outcomes. The study, called Project Access, reveals clear evidence of a glass ceiling for women in certain fields, notes differences in publication patterns, and elucidates the way that family-related issues-such as raising children and living in a two-scientist household-disproportionately affect women.

Gerhard Sonnert Gerald Holton
INVESTIGATORS: Gerhard Sonnert, left and Gerald Holton examined 508 men and 191 women scientists.

Among the study's findings is that women in the physical sciences, math, and engineering who received their Ph.D.'s before 1978 are only about half as likely as men to have achieved the rank of full professor. And female scientists with children are at least six times more likely than male scientists...

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