The Next Computer Revolution

COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS Physics Today. October 1987. Vol. 40, no. 10. Pages 25-72. American Institute of Physics, New York. The special articles in the October 1987 issue of Physics Today explore not only the use of computers by scientists, but also the discipline of computational science—a mode of operation complementary to, and distinguishable from, the familiar methods of theoretical and experimental science. The introduction and four review articles show clearly that computer simulati

Peterkin Jr
Jan 24, 1988
COMPUTATIONAL
PHYSICS

Physics Today. October 1987. Vol.
40, no. 10. Pages 25-72. American
Institute of Physics, New York.

The special articles in the October 1987 issue of Physics Today explore not only the use of computers by scientists, but also the discipline of computational science—a mode of operation complementary to, and distinguishable from, the familiar methods of theoretical and experimental science. The introduction and four review articles show clearly that computer simulations can discover unexpected behavior in dynamical systems. As Martin Karplus points out in his article, for example, progress in molecular dynamics is hastened when researchers are able to make comparisons between simulation and experiment.

"Exploiting Highly Concurrent Computers for Physics” by Ken C. Bowler et al is a marvelous article that discusses the use of parallel processing on a lattice to computer disparate quantities such as the hadronic masses from the standard model of the strong interaction to...

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