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The Nomadic Scientists Of Today: Where Is Their Sense Of Loyalty?

As more researchers switch labs, concerns mount over the nature of relationships between leading scientists and their institutions Rein Saral and three of his colleagues in the bone marrow transplant program at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore are moving to Emory University in Atlanta. Surgical oncologist David Morton and about a half-dozen other investigators at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of California, Los Angeles, have switched to other institutions throu

Susan L-J Dickinson
As more researchers switch labs, concerns mount over the nature of relationships between leading scientists and their institutions
Rein Saral and three of his colleagues in the bone marrow transplant program at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore are moving to Emory University in Atlanta. Surgical oncologist David Morton and about a half-dozen other investigators at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of California, Los Angeles, have switched to other institutions throughout the United States. And oncologist Carlo Croce, along with 25 principal investigators associated with him, is relocating from Temple University's Fels Institute in Philadelphia across town to Jefferson Medical College.

Although no one keeps statistics on the number of scientists who change institutions in any given year, many researchers and administrators say they are observing an increase in the incidence of these moves. It is a trend about which some are comfortable, some concerned. But virtually everyone...

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