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The People End : Fluidity and Flexibility are Key

The growth of the CRO industry has led to a plethora of new employment opportunities, both within CROs and pharmaceutical and biotechnology firms managing their relationships with CROs or other contract-service providers. BOOMING: Charles and Cathy Lineberry left positions at Glaxo Wellcome to form their own CRO. Pharmacologist/pathologist John S. Noble, president of Innapharma Inc., a small CRO in Suffern, N.Y., worked initially as a bench scientist, and eventually became director of worldw

Myrna Watanabe
The growth of the CRO industry has led to a plethora of new employment opportunities, both within CROs and pharmaceutical and biotechnology firms managing their relationships with CROs or other contract-service providers.

Charles and Cathy Lineberry BOOMING: Charles and Cathy Lineberry left positions at Glaxo Wellcome to form their own CRO.


Pharmacologist/pathologist John S. Noble, president of Innapharma Inc., a small CRO in Suffern, N.Y., worked initially as a bench scientist, and eventually became director of worldwide medical products development for American Cyanamid Co. in Princeton, N.J. (which was acquired by American Home Products). He left the company for consulting work and eventually began to contract service, which, he says, "gradually grew into a full-scale CRO company." Noble never imagined the twist his career has taken: "That was not my plan."

But he finds the frustrations of working in a "very large, heavily structured organization" now are gone for him. He thinks this...

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