The Rehabilitation of N.I. Bukharin

Science in the Soviet Union, which inherited the Academy of Sciences founded by Peter the Great, is a difficult subject of study. Many war memorials in the Soviet Union carry the proud words, "Nobody forgets; nobody is forgotten." That is, nobody forgets those-who died in defense of the ideals of communism and the territory of the U.S.S.R. But, in light of others who perished, it might be added "Nobody remembers; those who do remember do not say."A number of major, but inconvenient, figures ha

Alan Mackay
May 1, 1988

Science in the Soviet Union, which inherited the Academy of Sciences founded by Peter the Great, is a difficult subject of study. Many war memorials in the Soviet Union carry the proud words, "Nobody forgets; nobody is forgotten." That is, nobody forgets those-who died in defense of the ideals of communism and the territory of the U.S.S.R. But, in light of others who perished, it might be added "Nobody remembers; those who do remember do not say."A number of major, but inconvenient, figures have simply dropped out of the history of the Soviet Union. This is a pity, because some of them have had interesting ideas about science, particularly the ways in which science could be applied to forwarding the aims of society. One of these non-persons is N.I. Bukharim, who at one time might have become Lenin’s heir. Bukharin, in fact, might be claimed as one of the founders...

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