Three Leading Physics Groups Gather Headquarters Under One Roof

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD.--Right now there are 24 acres of mud, grass, and trees. But when construction is completed by the fall of next year, two of the United States' largest physics societies will leave their cramped offices in New York and join a third group in moving to a brand-new, spacious, five-story office building just outside Washington, D.C. The move is designed to improve professional information gathering and interaction with government policy-making institutions and other scien

Ron Kaufman
Sep 13, 1992

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD.--Right now there are 24 acres of mud, grass, and trees. But when construction is completed by the fall of next year, two of the United States' largest physics societies will leave their cramped offices in New York and join a third group in moving to a brand-new, spacious, five-story office building just outside Washington, D.C.

The move is designed to improve professional information gathering and interaction with government policy-making institutions and other science organizations, according to officials of the three societies. In addition, the proximity of the groups will facilitate better program development beneficial to all of their members, the officials say.

Dubbed the American Center for Physics (ACP), the new headquarters--whose plot lies to the east of the University of Maryland's College Park campus--will become the official home for the American Physical Society (APS), the American Institute of Physics (AIP), and the American Association of...

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