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Traitors or Trailblazers? Scientists Pursue """"Alternative"""" Careers

SERENDIPITY: Carol Yoon, a freelance writer in Bellingham, Wash., was convinced she would hate science journalism until she landed a fellowship that placed her at the Portland Oregonian for a summer. Carol Yoon, a freelance writer in Bellingham, Wash., was convinced she would hate science journalism until she landed a fellowship that placed her at the Portland Oregonian for a summer. "I did it on a lark," she says. Discovering that she enjoyed writing about science, Yoon remarks, was "a t

Karen Hopkin

SERENDIPITY: Carol Yoon, a freelance writer in Bellingham, Wash., was convinced she would hate science journalism until she landed a fellowship that placed her at the Portland Oregonian for a summer.
Carol Yoon, a freelance writer in Bellingham, Wash., was convinced she would hate science journalism until she landed a fellowship that placed her at the Portland Oregonian for a summer. "I did it on a lark," she says. Discovering that she enjoyed writing about science, Yoon remarks, was "a total shock."

Even if you have the perfect career in your sights, it's still not easy leaving the fold, comments Goodman. Advisors and associates may tell you that you're wasting your training and making a mistake.

Maybe your mentors feel they've failed you as academic parents, she says. And perhaps your colleagues are angry because they're also unhappy but too scared to try something new, explains Yoon, who got her...

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