U. K. Revises Rules on Gene Engineering

LONDON—British scientists would be required to seek permission for experiments involving genetic manipulation under new regulations proposed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and the Advisory Committee on Genetic Manipulation (ACGM). The new rules would modify those adopted in 1978, which dealt exclusively with laboratory work. The proposal would also widen the definition of genetic manipulation to include the direct introduction of recombinant nucleic acid into a cell or organi

Alison Stewart
Nov 29, 1987

LONDON—British scientists would be required to seek permission for experiments involving genetic manipulation under new regulations proposed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and the Advisory Committee on Genetic Manipulation (ACGM).

The new rules would modify those adopted in 1978, which dealt exclusively with laboratory work. The proposal would also widen the definition of genetic manipulation to include the direct introduction of recombinant nucleic acid into a cell or organism in which it does not occur naturally. The current definition covers only vector-mediated incorporation. Researchers were given until December 18 to comment on the changes.

The new rules would require scientists to notify the HSE of a general intention to do experiments involving genetic manipulation, as well as individual notification for certain high-risk experiments. Researchers who perform experiments of lesser risk would be required to submit an annual list of experiments carried out. Work involving the cloning of such...

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