ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Vita Writing for Academic Scientists

Applying for an academic post is considerably different from seeking a job in industry. Hence, the advice given in "Resumé Writing for Scientists” (September 21, 1987) tells only part of the tale. That article may serve those seeking jobs in industry (the resumé writers), but for those applying for an academic position (the vita writers), I suggest the following: DO: List every dollar you have raised by grants, scholarships, gifts and endowments. Include teaching awards y

Ian Phillips

Applying for an academic post is considerably different from seeking a job in industry. Hence, the advice given in "Resumé Writing for Scientists” (September 21, 1987) tells only part of the tale. That article may serve those seeking jobs in industry (the resumé writers), but for those applying for an academic position (the vita writers), I suggest the following:

DO:

List every dollar you have raised by grants, scholarships, gifts and endowments.

Include teaching awards you have won

Check with your references before including their names on your vita.

DON'T:

Have your vita prepared by a professional printer.

List your hobbies.

Try to give the impression that you have written more papers than you have read.

·Never have your vita prepared by a professional printer. Although form and substance go together, that kind of form immediately makes one suspect the substance. Some of the best applications I have ever seen...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT