Women Still Rarely Named To Fill Top Posts At Life Science Journals

Life Science Journals The career of nearly every scientist-male or female on a university faculty includes a stint reviewing papers for professional journals. But at the higher levels of editorial leadership-the editors-in-chief and other senior-level journal editors -- the number of men far outpaces the number of women. For example, Science, Nature, Cell, the Journal of Molecular Biology, Genetics, Molecular and Cellular Biology, the Journal of Immunology, and many others all have a male scien

Lee Katterman
Mar 3, 1996

Life Science Journals The career of nearly every scientist-male or female on a university faculty includes a stint reviewing papers for professional journals. But at the higher levels of editorial leadership-the editors-in-chief and other senior-level journal editors -- the number of men far outpaces the number of women. For example, Science, Nature, Cell, the Journal of Molecular Biology, Genetics, Molecular and Cellular Biology, the Journal of Immunology, and many others all have a male scientist as the editor at the top.

This disparity, according to those who have been involved in promoting opportunites for women in science, is a sign that the status of female researchers still lags behind that of their male counterparts. "It's important to get women in positions of influence in the science community," contends Ellen Weaver, who served as president of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) in 1992-93. Such influential positions include journal editors...

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