Photo of fish in the Haemulidae family
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought
Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, Laurent Olivier
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought

Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.

Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, Laurent Olivier

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