A new flavor of genomics

The European public's dislike for genetically modified foods shows no sign of waning, but Denmark's ingredient firms aren't letting a little thing like overwhelming public distrust stop them.

Stephen Pincock
Dec 5, 2004

The European public's dislike for genetically modified foods shows no sign of waning, but Denmark's ingredient firms aren't letting a little thing like overwhelming public distrust stop them. In November, a group of the country's food industry companies outlined a strategy that envisioned a future in which biotechnology played a bigger role in the food industry. Among other things, they foresaw genomics and proteomics being used to create more flavorful foods.

The 10-year strategy was put together by several companies: Danisco, Chr. Hansen, Arla Foods, and Novozymes. Peter Olesen, executive vice president for research and development at Hansen, says it was developed in the context of a planned boost to research funding in Denmark. As the country lives up to EU expectations that it spend 3% of GDP on research, the food industry hopes that some of the extra cash generated will be funneled in its direction. "But for us,...

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