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Notebook

NICOTINE FOE: Richard Johnson, right, professor and director of neurology at Johns Hopkins University Medical School, welcomes former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop to the podium for his talk on the tobacco agreements. While President Bill Clinton praised research and denounced tobacco in one breath during his February 13 speech at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting, his exhalations failed to mention that his plans for stoking one depend on snuffing

The Scientist Staff


NICOTINE FOE: Richard Johnson, right, professor and director of neurology at Johns Hopkins University Medical School, welcomes former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop to the podium for his talk on the tobacco agreements.
While President Bill Clinton praised research and denounced tobacco in one breath during his February 13 speech at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting, his exhalations failed to mention that his plans for stoking one depend on snuffing the other. "We must seize this moment to strengthen our nation for the new century by expanding our commitment to discovery-increasing our support for science, pressing for progress in the war against cancer and other diseases, protecting our children from public health dangers, most especially from the deadly addiction of tobacco," Clinton said during his address to a crowd of about 5,000. Clinton also called for taxes on cigarettes to increase by $1.50 a...

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