Notebook

PEACEMAKER: Award-winner David Kritchevsky said he wanted "to prevent squabbles". David Kritchevsky received no official advance notice that he would receive the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR)'s first-ever Research Achievement Award, but he had been told it would be a good idea to attend AICR's annual research conference, held late last month in Washington, D.C., the organization's home city. "They didn't just pull me off the street," recalls Kritchevsky, the Institute Professo

The Scientist Staff
Sep 15, 1996


PEACEMAKER: Award-winner David Kritchevsky said he wanted "to prevent squabbles".
David Kritchevsky received no official advance notice that he would receive the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR)'s first-ever Research Achievement Award, but he had been told it would be a good idea to attend AICR's annual research conference, held late last month in Washington, D.C., the organization's home city. "They didn't just pull me off the street," recalls Kritchevsky, the Institute Professor at Philadelphia's Wistar Institute. "I had been advised to come to the meeting because something would happen to me." AICR presented Kritchevsky with the award to recognize his work in diet, nutrition, and cancer -- the areas that happen to be the group's exclusive focus. The award includes a $5,000 grant. Kritchevsky, who also teaches at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, reports that his acceptance speech included both some praise of his own and...

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