Notebook

The 1995-96 Wolf Prizes, given annually by the Israel-based Wolf Foundation, will be presented March 24 by the president of Israel, Ezer Weizman, at the Israeli Knesset in Jerusalem. Each award of $100,000 will be given for outstanding achievements in mathematics, medicine, chemistry, agriculture, and the arts. According to a statement by the Wolf Foundation, chemists Gilbert Stork of Columbia University and Samuel J. Danishefsky of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and Columbi

The Scientist Staff
Jan 21, 1996

The 1995-96 Wolf Prizes, given annually by the Israel-based Wolf Foundation, will be presented March 24 by the president of Israel, Ezer Weizman, at the Israeli Knesset in Jerusalem. Each award of $100,000 will be given for outstanding achievements in mathematics, medicine, chemistry, agriculture, and the arts. According to a statement by the Wolf Foundation, chemists Gilbert Stork of Columbia University and Samuel J. Danishefsky of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and Columbia will share the Wolf Prize for chemistry for their research leading to the synthesis of complex molecules that made possible the development of new biological and medicinal compounds.

Stanley Prusiner REASON TO HOWL: Stanley Prusiner won a Wolf Prize for medicine.


Robert Langlands of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., and Princeton University professor Andrew Wiles, also affiliated with the institute, will share the prize for mathematics for their ground-breaking work in number theory....

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